Motherly Kindness: How to Show the Love We Feel

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The love a mother feels for her child is hard to put into words. Sometimes it’s even harder to know how to show it because there is so much to do in a day that has to do with rule-making, organizing, routines, and general hectic living. Sometimes our quick, “Love ya!” might not say all we intend and so we have to go the extra mile to show the love with kindness.

Four Out of the Ordinary Simple Examples of Ways to Show Kindness 

Mothers show kindness from morning to night, but they may not recognize that what they are doing isn’t as ordinary as they believe. It’s good to take credit for the kindness you give your child.

1. When your child is running behind in the morning because they hit that snooze button one time too often, instead of raising your voice with that final warning, give him a hug and say how you understand how tired he feels. Those warm words might actually jostle him out of bed quicker than the warning and what a nice unordinary kindness.

2. When your child gets off the school bus with a scowl on his face because somebody on the ride hurt his feelings, he may then recover and step in line and sit down to do his homework as usual. Give him a special sweet snack with a few words that it looks like it was a long day for him. That moment of kindness can go a long way to settle what might have been upset feelings that he had buried away.

3. When everyone is rushing out the door grabbing the skates, backpack, and extra scarf, stop your child for a moment and tell him how proud you are that he got everything together so well. That affirmation is a kindness that may set his day going in just the right direction.

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Laurie Hollman, Ph.D. is a psychoanalyst and author who does psychotherapy with infants and parents, children, adolescents, and adults. Dr. Hollman’s new book: Unlocking Parental Intelligence: Finding Meaning in Your Child’s Behavior is available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and Familius.com. She writes about infant, child and adolescent development, mental health, Parental Intelligence, and a broad range of parenting topics.

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